As a theatre historian and scenic designer housed in an English department, I am able to consistently create interdisciplinary classes that ask students to engage with text, space, and art. This page contains syllabi from all courses that I have taught, as well as a sampling of academic experiences which brought learning outside the classroom. 


Courses Taught

Please click on the course titles below to access syllabi and schedules.  


 Walking in the annual Rificolona Lantern Festival procession.

Walking in the annual Rificolona Lantern Festival procession.

Sample Academic Experiences

Freshman Florence Experience: Writing for College - Performing Florence

Marist sends 50 first-year undergraduates to our Florence, Italy campus each fall for a full-year immersive study abroad experience. Main campus faculty go over in the fall to teach and assist with introducing the students to Marist. In 2015, I taught Writing for College: Performing Florence in the FFE program. We were able to exploring traditional freshman composition course skills while discussing performance studies, as a field. The city of Florence became our classroom and provided numerous opportunities for observing and participating in traditional ritual performances. 

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 Students at the Festa de Santa Reparata procession during class.

Students at the Festa de Santa Reparata procession during class.


Dramaturgy Independent Study

 Sara, Kim, Eileen, and Essence at HWS

Sara, Kim, Eileen, and Essence at HWS

In the fall of 2014, I was asked by Dr. Heather May to serve as Production Dramaturg for a performance of Tartuffe at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. I was able to include three of our theatre students as dramaturgy assistants during a semester-long group independent study in dramaturgy. Thanks to HWS Sound Designer Kelly Walker, we were able to Skype into rehearsal, in addition to driving up to Geneva for technical rehearsals. 


Capping: Amateur Performance

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Marist's senior capstone course seeks to cap the institutional Core curriculum within individual majors. This interdisciplinary course asked students to consider amateur performance, as amateur performers. After surveying theoretical, historical, and literary texts from and about amateur performance, students devised, wrote, and staged a series of modern cycle plays. This modernization included scenes from contemporary life, and a student-conceived and faculty-designed hell mouth which re-conceived seminal childhood memories (Where the Wild Things Are) into a passage out of college and protection and into the real world. 

 

 Audiences watching  The View from Heaven . Throughout, audiences walked from platform to platform watching the modernized life of Christ as a Marist student, mimicking the Medieval Cycle Play format.

Audiences watching The View from Heaven. Throughout, audiences walked from platform to platform watching the modernized life of Christ as a Marist student, mimicking the Medieval Cycle Play format.

 Construction of the Hell Mouth.

Construction of the Hell Mouth.

 Final Hell Mouth in performance, with Capping students Tom Lotito and Nick Sweeney.

Final Hell Mouth in performance, with Capping students Tom Lotito and Nick Sweeney.